Skip to main content

How to find File in Linux

For that we can use "find" command.

EXAMPLES

find /home -user joe

Find every file under the directory /home owned by the user joe.

find /usr -name *stat

Find every file under the directory /usr ending in ".stat".

find /var/spool -mtime +60

Find every file under the directory /var/spool that was modified more than 60 days ago.

find /tmp -name core -type f -print | xargs /bin/rm -f

Find files named core in or below the directory /tmp and delete them. Note that this will work incorrectly if there are any filenames containing newlines, single or double quotes, or spaces.

find /tmp -name core -type f -print0 | xargs -0 /bin/rm -f

Find files named core in or below the directory /tmp and delete them, processing filenames in such a way that file or directory names containing single or double quotes, spaces or newlines are correctly handled. The -name test comes before the -type test in order to avoid having to call stat(2) on every file.

find . -type f -exec file '{}' \;

Runs `file' on every file in or below the current directory. Notice that the braces are enclosed in single quote marks to protect them from interpretation as shell script punctuation. The semicolon is similarly protected by the use of a backslash, though ';' could have been used in that case also.

find / \( -perm -4000 -fprintf /root/suid.txt '%#m %u %p\n' \) , \
\( -size +100M -fprintf /root/big.txt '%-10s %p\n' \)


Traverse the filesystem just once, listing setuid files and directories into /root/suid.txt and large files into /root/big.txt.

find $HOME -mtime 0

Search for files in your home directory which have been modified in the last twenty-four hours. This command works this way because the time since each file was last modified is divided by 24 hours and any remainder is discarded. That means that to match -mtime

0, a file will have to have a modification in the past which is less than 24 hours ago.

find . -perm 664

Search for files which have read and write permission for their owner, and group, but which other users can read but not write to. Files which meet these criteria but have other permissions bits set (for example if someone can execute the file) will not be matched.

find . -perm -664

Search for files which have read and write permission for their owner and group, and which other users can read, without regard to the presence of any extra permission bits (for example the executable bit). This will match a file which has mode 0777, for example.

find . -perm /222

Search for files which are writable by somebody (their owner, or their group, or anybody else).

find . -perm /220
find . -perm /u+w,g+w
find . -perm /u=w,g=w

All three of these commands do the same thing, but the first one uses the octal representation of the file mode, and the other two use the symbolic form. These commands all search for files which are writable by either their owner or their group. The files don't have to be writable by both the owner and group to be matched; either will do.

find . -perm -220
find . -perm -g+w,u+w


Both these commands do the same thing; search for files which are writable by both their owner and their group.

find . -perm -444 -perm /222 ! -perm /111
find . -perm -a+r -perm /a+w ! -perm /a+x


These two commands both search for files that are readable for everybody (-perm -444 or -perm -a+r), have at least on write bit set (-perm /222 or -perm /a+w) but are not executable for anybody (! -perm /111 and ! -perm /a+x respectively)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Java Source Code to Change Local IP Address

Hi guys..

Try This code to change your Local IP address.


import java.io.IOException;
import java.lang.Runtime;
public class Chang_Ip {



public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException
{

String str1="192.168.0.201";
String str2="255.255.255.0";
String[] command1 = { "netsh", "interface", "ip", "set", "address",
"name=", "Local Area Connection" ,"source=static", "addr=",str1,
"mask=", str2};
Process pp = java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command1);

}


}

How to preserving HTTP headers in WSO2 ESB 4.9.0 ?

Preserving HTTP headers are important when executing backend services via applications/middleware. This is because most of the time certain important headers are removed or modified by the applications/middleware which run the communication. The previous version of our WSO2 ESB, version 4.8.1, only supported “server” and “user agent” header fields to preserve with, but with the new ESB 4.9.0, we’ve introduced a new new property (http.headers.preserve) for the passthru (repository/conf/passthru-http.properties) and Nhttp(repository/conf/nhttp.properties) transporters to preserve more HTTP headers.
Passthru transporter – support header fields LocationKeep-AliveContent-LengthContent-TypeDateServerUser-AgentHostNhttp transport – support headersServerUser-AgentDate
You can specify header fields which should be preserved in a comma-separated list, as shown below. http.headers.preserve = Location, Date, Server Note that properties(http.user.agent.preserve, http.server.preserve), which were used …

How Schedule failover message processor helps for the guaranteed delivery ?

Before we talk about the failover message forwarding processor, it’s better to understand the big picture of the concepts and use cases. The Scheduled Failover Message Forwarding Processor is part of the bigger picture of themessage store and message processor.

Message Store Message Processor. WSO2 ESB’s Message-stores and Message-processorsare used to store incoming messages and then deliver them to a particular backend with added Quality of Services (QoS), such as throttling and guaranteed delivery. The basic advantage of the MSMP is that it allows you to send messages reliably to a backend service. These messages can be stored in a different reliable storage such as JMS, JDBC message stores. The MSMP powered by three basic components:



1. Store Mediator.
The Store mediator is the synapse mediator and can be used to store messages in the message store.

2. Message Store.
A message store is storage in the ESB for messages. The WSO2 ESB comes with four types of message store implementations …